Tim Anderson

View on Amazon

[Cross-posted from New Books in Popular Music] Since the 1990s, the music industry has been going through a massive transformation. After World War II, the primary way audiences participated in the music business in the period between 1945 and 1990 was by purchasing records and attending concerts. The internet and the mp3 file, however, have changed how people are listening to music.

In Popular Music in a Digital Music Economy: Problems and Practices for an Emerging Service Industry (Routledge, 2014), Tim Anderson explores how the music industry is changing from selling records as its primary purpose to a new paradigm in which artists must be entrepreneurial, audiences are end users, and record companies are investing in music brands, not simply records. Anderson’s book is a great guide for this new world. In his book, he draws on a wide range of examples from Moby and Lupe Fiasco to Amanda Palmer and Jonathan Coulton. He also introduces readers to the role that music supervisors, such as Alexandra Pastavas, are playing in film and television.

Dr. Tim Anderson is an assistant professor at Old Dominion University in the Department of Communication and Theatre Arts. He is also the author of Making Easy Listening: Material Culture and Postwar American Recording. Dr. Anderson can be contacted at tjanders@odu.edu.

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Joe MoranArmchair Nation: An Intimate History of Britain in Front of the TV

July 30, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in European Studies] The social and cultural historian Joe Moran, Professor of English and Cultural History at Liverpool John Moores University, UK is interested in the everyday moments between great events. In his books Queuing for Beginners: The Story of Daily Life from Breakfast to Bedtime, On Roads: A Hidden History and now Armchair Nation: An Intimate [...]

Read the full article →

Judith DonathThe Social Machine: Designs for Living Online

July 19, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] The conversation about the Web and social media skews toward a discussion of the potential for connections, and how both individuals and organizations are using the media to communicate, to form communities, and to conduct business. Lacking, for the most part, is an investigation of the design of these spaces [...]

Read the full article →

Lisa GitelmanPaper Knowledge: Toward a Media History of Documents

July 9, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in History] “One doesn’t so much read a death certificate, it would seem, as perform calisthenics on one…” From the first, prefatory page of Lisa Gitelman’s new book, the reader is introduced to a way of thinking about documents as tools for creating bodily experience, and as material objects situated within hierarchies and relationships of labor. [...]

Read the full article →

Payal AroraThe Leisure Commons: A Spatial History of Web 2.0

July 2, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] Scholars and commentators have used metaphor in an attempt to describe the Web since public access began. Think of ideas like the information highway, cyberspace, the digital library, etc. In her new book, The Leisure Commons: A Spatial History of Web 2.0 (Routledge, 2014), Payal Arora, an assistant professor in the Department of [...]

Read the full article →

John Nathan AndersonRadio’s Digital Dilemma: Broadcasting in the 21st Century

June 20, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Media and Communications] John Nathan Anderson’s new book, Radio’s Digital Dilemma: Broadcasting in the 21st Century (Routledge, 2014), documents the somewhat tortured path of broadcast radio’s digital transition in the United States.  Beginning his analysis with rise of neoliberal communications policy in the 1980s, Anderson charts the development of the idea of digitalization by closely [...]

Read the full article →

Vili Lehdonvirta and Edward CastronovaVirtual Economies: Design and Analysis

June 19, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Book in Technology] The continued growth of online gaming and virtual worlds has effects not only in the analog world, with games and social media organizations taking stock options public, but also in the worlds created online. Many games and platforms allow users to involve themselves in virtual labor, to own property, and most [...]

Read the full article →

Lori EmersonReading Writing Interfaces: From the Digital to the Bookbound

June 12, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] How much do we really think about the technology that we spend so much time using? More specifically, have you really ever considered the possible effects that the use of technology like your laptop, tablet, cellphone, etc. has on your reading, writing, and overall production of materials? In her new [...]

Read the full article →

Vincent MoscoTo the Cloud: Big Data in a Turbulent World

May 29, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Book in Technology] The “cloud” and “cloud computing” have been buzzwords over the past few years, with businesses and even governments praising the ability to save information remotely and access that information from anywhere. And an increasing number of organizations and individuals are using the cloud almost exclusively for their computing and storage [...]

Read the full article →

Michael SalerAs If: Modern Enchantment and the Literary Prehistory of Virtual Reality

May 12, 2014

In As If: Modern Enchantment and the Literary Prehistory of Virtual Reality (Oxford, 2012), historian Michael Saler explores the precursors of the current proliferation of digital virtual worlds. Saler challenges Max Weber’s analysis of modernity as the disenchanting of the world, and demonstrates that modernity is deeply “enchanted by reason.” Saler demonstrates this argument by [...]

Read the full article →